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  • Eddie Whittle
    Eddie Whittle Blackburn
    I first heard of Geist from the unsigned section of the now defunct CDWow website. They were different, folky rock with some rather impressive lyrics. Sadly Geist went their separate ways but thankfully Jon McDevitt is still making music, and with The River and the Burial Ground is still hitting the same high notes as with Geist. It’s has a bit more of a blues hint than the folksiness of Geist but it really works on this album. If you like your music with lyrics which take you on a journey and songs which offer something new with every listen then you should give this album a chance. Highlights for me are the Geist classic Lemon Days, still one of my favourite songs and In The Late Hours, a song about sleepless nights where your thoughts run wild… I do like the fact that I have this album and it’s a hidden gem, its feels more special, but this album deserves to be listened to, not because of marketing or fancy X factor dancing but because of the music. It truly is a fantastic album shown by the fact I put it on in my car and it was still playing 3 weeks later and was a fresh as the first day I listened to it. So take a chance, give it a listen. If you like real music delivered with true feeling you will not be disappointed.

    I first heard of Geist from the unsigned section of the now defunct CDWow website. They were different, folky rock with some rather impressive lyrics. Sadly Geist went their separate ways but thankfully Jon McDevitt is still making music, and with The River and the Burial Ground is still hitting the same high notes as with Geist. It’s has a bit more of a blues hint than the folksiness of Geist but it really works on this album.
    If you like your music with lyrics which take you on a journey and songs which offer something new with every listen then you should give this album a chance. Highlights for me are the Geist classic Lemon Days, still one of my favourite songs and In The Late Hours, a song about sleepless nights where your thoughts run wild…

    I do like the fact that I have this album and it’s a hidden gem, its feels more special, but this album deserves to be listened to, not because of marketing or fancy X factor dancing but because of the music. It truly is a fantastic album shown by the fact I put it on in my car and it was still playing 3 weeks later and was a fresh as the first day I listened to it.

    So take a chance, give it a listen. If you like real music delivered with true feeling you will not be disappointed.

  • David Standing
    David Standing Crawley
    The experience starts from the Moody cover and intrigue in the title. The CD it's self gives a clue to this being an Album in the traditional sense of a Journey through a series of songs, rather than a rushed few downloads of favorites. The opening track (Downmarket) takes you by the hand and pulls you gently into the music. As the track progresses, you soon become aware of the craftsmanship typical of this album. There is massive space and ambiance in the music and all the instrumentation and effects are subtle and timed to perfection. All the arrangements appear simple on the surface, with few instruments. Its the way they are arranged that makes the music engage you. Crisp Guitar sounds giving the back bone to most racks, with accompanying piano, with some beautiful tones. There are many subtle orchestral sounds that fit, just like a jig saw puzzle piece. Some surprise Guitar lead breaks. The vocals sit just right where they should. As you move through the tracks, there is some very clever gear changing going on. From track one's invitation in, into track two, where you're on your way with an upbeat sounding country and western, but not quite song. It's during track two I noticed the story telling that makes these songs very distinctive. You could stand on a west end stage a deliver one of these songs and not feel out of place. Very pertinent to track three "Half a world away". OMG Track four - Lemon days - A retro sounding mood song. Minor chords central, with some beautiful sounding instrumentation. This song will definitely take you somewhere else. Follow that..... It does, with "Broken Blues" A clever morphing song, building with choir like backing vocal. I recon If you put a few bells on this you'd have a classy Christmas Hit. Jasmine is the track where a lot of people can start skipping on Albums. Don't. Seriously, you'll miss out big time. You'll miss a Robbie Williams esc moment in Jasmine. The 12 string beauty of "Sunburn" with it's Peter Gabriel esc ambiance. The stripped back elegance of "May". Then the title track with the albums signature of cleverly crafted music scaping. Then "Satellite" a song that rings your journey is coming to a close. With a classic harmonica reminiscent of Karma Chameleon in sound and quality. Ending the Journey with the thought provoking "In the late hours". Gently bringing the train into the station to disembark, until the next time......Nice one Jon....

    The experience starts from the Moody cover and intrigue in the title. The CD it's self gives a clue to this being an Album in the traditional sense of a Journey through a series of songs, rather than a rushed few downloads of favorites. The opening track (Downmarket) takes you by the hand and pulls you gently into the music. As the track progresses, you soon become aware of the craftsmanship typical of this album. There is massive space and ambiance in the music and all the instrumentation and effects are subtle and timed to perfection. All the arrangements appear simple on the surface, with few instruments. Its the way they are arranged that makes the music engage you. Crisp Guitar sounds giving the back bone to most racks, with accompanying piano, with some beautiful tones. There are many subtle orchestral sounds that fit, just like a jig saw puzzle piece. Some surprise Guitar lead breaks. The vocals sit just right where they should. As you move through the tracks, there is some very clever gear changing going on. From track one's invitation in, into track two, where you're on your way with an upbeat sounding country and western, but not quite song. It's during track two I noticed the story telling that makes these songs very distinctive. You could stand on a west end stage a deliver one of these songs and not feel out of place. Very pertinent to track three "Half a world away". OMG Track four - Lemon days - A retro sounding mood song. Minor chords central, with some beautiful sounding instrumentation. This song will definitely take you somewhere else. Follow that..... It does, with "Broken Blues" A clever morphing song, building with choir like backing vocal. I recon If you put a few bells on this you'd have a classy Christmas Hit. Jasmine is the track where a lot of people can start skipping on Albums. Don't. Seriously, you'll miss out big time. You'll miss a Robbie Williams esc moment in Jasmine. The 12 string beauty of "Sunburn" with it's Peter Gabriel esc ambiance. The stripped back elegance of "May". Then the title track with the albums signature of cleverly crafted music scaping. Then "Satellite" a song that rings your journey is coming to a close. With a classic harmonica reminiscent of Karma Chameleon in sound and quality. Ending the Journey with the thought provoking "In the late hours". Gently bringing the train into the station to disembark, until the next time......Nice one Jon....

  • Neill Tupman
    Neill Tupman Southwater
    'The River And The Burial Ground' is a proper album. By which I mean it reminds me of when I would buy a vinyl album back in the day, then sit and listen to it from start to finish whilst absorbing the artwork and lyrics. Indeed the album is packaged in this way (I'm lucky enough to have a physical CD copy), and I felt an immediate connection between the dark and intriguing cover art and the music whilst listening. This is classic British songwriting at it's best; a noir-ish feel but also enchanting and beguiling in equal measures. Love, loss, life and death are themes that are covered, and there's also healthy slices of wit and celebration mixed in too. There are perhaps more subjective themes present in some tracks (indeed small samples link certain songs) so I can only surmise that there's a narrative here (again, proper album), but I'm still enjoying figuring that one out. The arrangements and production are top-notch, with the tasteful use of piano, guitars, harmonica and strings over an expertly restrained rhythm section, inspired - often sublime on tracks like 'Lemon Days' and 'Sunburn'. Jon's vocals are soulful, sometimes sad, but drip with honesty and charm. Layered harmony backing vocals only add another gorgeous texture to the mix, and send those hairs on the arms tingling (check out the title track). With all that, there's still space, restraint and a complete understanding of what the song needs (or doesn't). I get the impression this album may have been a long time coming, but I dont think I've heard a better put together album in years. Tempo and moods vary, and there really is something for most discerning listeners here. From the Beach Boys-esque 'Sunburn', to the Lynne/Petty referencing 'Satellite'. The title track sounds like it could've soundtracked a Sergio Leone western; its rolling, insistent blues highlighting some really strong guitar work. I have no doubt that repeated listens will yield more surprises, oh - and on headphones... "just wonderful". I cannot recommend this album enough, it's been on constant rotation in the my car. Its quiet release in early 2020 deserves wider attention - yours.

    'The River And The Burial Ground' is a proper album. By which I mean it reminds me of when I would buy a vinyl album back in the day, then sit and listen to it from start to finish whilst absorbing the artwork and lyrics. Indeed the album is packaged in this way (I'm lucky enough to have a physical CD copy), and I felt an immediate connection between the dark and intriguing cover art and the music whilst listening.

    This is classic British songwriting at it's best; a noir-ish feel but also enchanting and beguiling in equal measures. Love, loss, life and death are themes that are covered, and there's also healthy slices of wit and celebration mixed in too. There are perhaps more subjective themes present in some tracks (indeed small samples link certain songs) so I can only surmise that there's a narrative here (again, proper album), but I'm still enjoying figuring that one out.

    The arrangements and production are top-notch, with the tasteful use of piano, guitars, harmonica and strings over an expertly restrained rhythm section, inspired - often sublime on tracks like 'Lemon Days' and 'Sunburn'. Jon's vocals are soulful, sometimes sad, but drip with honesty and charm. Layered harmony backing vocals only add another gorgeous texture to the mix, and send those hairs on the arms tingling (check out the title track). With all that, there's still space, restraint and a complete understanding of what the song needs (or doesn't). I get the impression this album may have been a long time coming, but I dont think I've heard a better put together album in years.

    Tempo and moods vary, and there really is something for most discerning listeners here. From the Beach Boys-esque 'Sunburn', to the Lynne/Petty referencing 'Satellite'. The title track sounds like it could've soundtracked a Sergio Leone western; its rolling, insistent blues highlighting some really strong guitar work. I have no doubt that repeated listens will yield more surprises, oh - and on headphones... "just wonderful".

    I cannot recommend this album enough, it's been on constant rotation in the my car. Its quiet release in early 2020 deserves wider attention - yours.

  • Paul Stanworth
    Paul Stanworth Horsham
    This, I can honestly say, is one of my favourite albums ever. An original masterpiece by Jon McDevitt. The variety and attention to detail is something else on a collection of songs that are beautifully crafted, arranged and delivered - a very enjoyable and at times, emotional journey of an album. From the openers, the ‘Golden Slumbers’ inspired ‘Downmarket’ & the catchy and quirky ‘For Want Of Something Better’ through to the wistful longing of ‘Broken Blues (For Cam)’ - a perfect, reflective tribute to a friend taken too soon - and then on to a rousing finale with the band kicking in for songs like ‘Satellite’ after a succession of gems along the way. With fantastic contributions from guest musicians including Léanie Kaleido, Neill Tupman & James McClusky, if you are serious about supporting hard working musicians and want to own an album that is up there with the best, I suggest you buy it!

    This, I can honestly say, is one of my favourite albums ever. An original masterpiece by Jon McDevitt. The variety and attention to detail is something else on a collection of songs that are beautifully crafted, arranged and delivered - a very enjoyable and at times, emotional journey of an album. From the openers, the ‘Golden Slumbers’ inspired ‘Downmarket’ & the catchy and quirky ‘For Want Of Something Better’ through to the wistful longing of ‘Broken Blues (For Cam)’ - a perfect, reflective tribute to a friend taken too soon - and then on to a rousing finale with the band kicking in for songs like ‘Satellite’ after a succession of gems along the way. With fantastic contributions from guest musicians including Léanie Kaleido, Neill Tupman & James McClusky, if you are serious about supporting hard working musicians and want to own an album that is up there with the best, I suggest you buy it!

  • Francesca
    Francesca Rome, Italy
    This album came with me all the way to Italy and has been listened and listened over and over again. Despite the very English atmosphere, is versatile and, considering that over here, the great messages in the lyrics couldn't get through, every soul really enjoyed. And this is the power of your music Jon, clever but open to interpretations. I felt like I was coming back to a good way of thinking, yes you are right ... I don't think straight and yes, it seems like I will never. Thank you very much! Flexible and fluid, paying attention at the music, is what I can say, few very clever movement in the harmony that keep the water flowing. Being a writer I do understand the urge of saying, and your music inspired a couple of short stories and the design of a great tattoo.

    This album came with me all the way to Italy and has been listened and listened over and over again. Despite the very English atmosphere, is versatile and, considering that over here, the great messages in the lyrics couldn't get through, every soul really enjoyed. And this is the power of your music Jon, clever but open to interpretations. I felt like I was coming back to a good way of thinking, yes you are right ... I don't think straight and yes, it seems like I will never. Thank you very much! Flexible and fluid, paying attention at the music, is what I can say, few very clever movement in the harmony that keep the water flowing. Being a writer I do understand the urge of saying, and your music inspired a couple of short stories and the design of a great tattoo.

  • Sue Weller
    Sue Weller Aylesbury
    The River & The Burial Ground - a personal little review. We had not seen Jon McDevitt since about 2005 when he was the lead singer in a band called Geist & wondered what he was doing now, musically. That's when he told us about his new cd, so listened to some snippets from it & immediately bought one. We were not disappointed - it was great from the start. Carefully crafted lyrics with lovely tunes to accompany them - each track very different & a pleasure to listen to. Loved all the songs but Satellite is my personal favorite. Can thoroughly recommend that you do what I did & take a listen to some of the tracks & I am sure you will be eager to own your own copy.

    The River & The Burial Ground - a personal little review.
    We had not seen Jon McDevitt since about 2005 when he was the lead singer in a band called Geist & wondered what he was doing now, musically. That's when he told us about his new cd, so listened to some snippets from it & immediately bought one.
    We were not disappointed - it was great from the start. Carefully crafted lyrics with lovely tunes to accompany them - each track very different & a pleasure to listen to. Loved all the songs but Satellite is my personal favorite. Can thoroughly recommend that you do what I did & take a listen to some of the tracks & I am sure you will be eager to own your own copy.

  • Kevin Poole
    Kevin Poole Crawley
    I have been familiar with Jon's sets and cover work and now have found his original material absolutely brilliant. The poinient lyrics coupled with such wonderful melodies puts this local artist amongst the best in the area if not the south. The river and the burial ground is a masterpiece indeed.

    I have been familiar with Jon's sets and cover work and now have found his original material absolutely brilliant. The poinient lyrics coupled with such wonderful melodies puts this local artist amongst the best in the area if not the south. The river and the burial ground is a masterpiece indeed.

  • Rose King
    Rose King West Sussex
    Thoughts on The River And The Burial Ground. Shades of Tom Waits/Ray Davies/Costello and traditional British story telling. Every song is unique and takes you to a different place. McDevitt's sensual voice is equal to his band of musicians. Making this an enjoyable and thoughtful album.

    Thoughts on The River And The Burial Ground.
    Shades of Tom Waits/Ray Davies/Costello and traditional British story telling. Every song is unique and takes you to a different place. McDevitt's sensual voice is equal to his band of musicians. Making this an enjoyable and thoughtful album.

  • Mihaela
    Mihaela Tunbridge Wells
    Lovely voice, great lyrics, always a pleasure to listen to your songs.

    Lovely voice, great lyrics, always a pleasure to listen to your songs.

  • frank payne
    frank payne
    allways a fan

    allways a fan